Category Archives: consumer

Samsung Gear smartwatch, not so impressed.

Samsung has recently announced its new smartwatch, the Gear.

As someone who likes his gadgets and that sort of technology-type stuff, a practical smartwatch linked through to my phone could be something I’d have in interest in. This watch has a workable colour screen 4 cm across and resolution of 320 by 320, and with all the things you might expect from such a device in the way of a camera and talking to your (Samsung) phone. (Compare this resolution to when desk top PCs first hit the mass market with monitors of 14 inches / 35.5 cm and a resolution of 640 by 480.)

However the one thing that totally kills it for me is the battery life. Samsung’s talking about a day’s use (and that’s when new!) which is just not what would interest me.

For something like this I need to know I can go away for a long week-end, use is extensively (but still sensibly) without any worry of it going flat or need to have to take a charger with me. So we’re talking about charging it Thursday night, going away Friday, then Sat and Sun out adventuring, heading back Monday for a Monday night charge, and doing this confidently knowing that it’s going to remain a working useful device for the whole period.

It would have been nice if they had managed to build into it a self-winding system similar to an automatic mechanical watch. This would have worked a small generator to help keep the battery charged as you move. There’s nothing special in this, kinetic-based quarts watches have been doing this for some years.

I guess it’s the usual story of never buy the early versions of anything, wait for the second generation to arrive.

My YouTube thoughts on it.

(Also Samsung Galaxy Gear announcement.)

Resolution size and quality

Video resolution, file size and image quality.

A while ago I thought I’d take my camera out for an afternoon’s videoing and so headed off to Linlithgow Palace. Once I’d got some editing done I found I had a video of just under 10 minutes in length. Usually I render out at 720p for a YouTube or Vimeo upload, but this time I thought I’d render at 1080p just to see how things went. At the end of the processing I found myself with a file of just over 2 gigabyte. This I thought a little bit large for uploading from home so went up to Uni did my upload (to Vimeo) from there. That went nice and fast, in fact it uploaded faster than the length of time it took me to type out title, description and all that sort of stuff. Once back home thought I would re-render it but this time in my more usual 720p (other settings the same) just to do a compare and contrast. My just under 10 minute came down at just over 400 megabyte.

So we’re talking about one fifth the size of the 1080p video. Playing the two videos side by side it was hard to notice any difference in quality, it was there but you really had to pick around the edges to see it. Now and again I’d pause at a suitable moment where perhaps a a sign was in view or maybe a car number plate or something similar and try and read it, and it was more readable in the 1080p version. However as a flowing video it was quite difficult to tell the difference between the two, yet the 720 giving me so much more free hard drive space compared to 1080.

I also rendered it out in standard definition quality at 360p size (looking towards uploads for mobile devices or older smart phones). Here we had a file size of just under 60 megabyte, or a little under 3% of the 1080p file size. Comparing the video here to the others there was a very definite reduction in quality. It still wasn’t too bad to watch, however when you had this 360 next to either the 720 or 1080 the difference really jumped out at you. On the other hand it was still more than good enough for a portable device if you were on the train.

Something to think about. Take the 1080 HD video size, which is a 1920 by 1080 rectangle. Multiply that out and it comes to just over 2 million pixels. Or to put it another way, if you’re in a shop talking about video and cameras and the sales staff are busy trying to sell you this camera rather than that camera because this camera has more mega pixels on the sensor… well, if you’re going to actually film at the native HD resolution then all you really need is this just over 2 mega-pixel size sensor. Bigger does not always mean better.

 

Premiere Pro or Final Cut?

Premiere Pro or Final Cut, which do I prefer.

I got my first proper video camera about 5 years ago, a small Panasonic non-HD camera (HD was around, but rather expensive for something I only wanted to experiment with), and like many people my first editing experience was with Windows Movie Maker. I soon realised that doing this was quite fun, and as this luckily coincided with a sharp fall in HD camera prices, I got myself a nice Canon HD camera.

At the time Windows Movie Maker would not do HD video so I bought a copy of Corel’s VideoStudio X2. However as time went on I wanted to do more with VideoStudio than what I was.

As I was also needing an upgrade for my PC I thought I’d basically start again, but rather than buy a new computer and then find software for it and then find how to use it I thought I’d firstly find some good video editing tutorials, see what software they was using, then see what hardware was needed for running that software. After a bit of browsing around (and some really horrific tutorials on YouTube) I came across a site called IzzyVideo, run by Izzy Hyman. He has done some really good tutorials (some free, some subscription only), both on editing techniques and on general video creation. What software was he tutoring on – Final Cut Pro 7 and Final Cut Express. What hardware does that need – Apple Mac.

Final Cut 7 was a bit expensive for me, plus it was overkill for what I wanted, but Final Cut Express, especially at education price made sense. Likewise I couldn’t afford a new Mac but a friend sourced a second hand MacBook for me. So that sorted that out, I’ll move across to Mac and go Final Cut Express.

Time goes by and there’s then the release of Final Cut Pro X (and all the controversy that caused!). It was released without quite a few features considered essential by the serious film making community, however for my use it was great, especially as Izzy Hyman very quickly released some great tutorials for it.

Time goes by again and I find myself playing with Photoshop CS6 and it’s through its limited video editing abilities I became aware of Premiere Pro. I also realise I could do with a system with more powerful graphics than what I was currently using. My two generations’ old MacBook Air seems to run all this software well enough for me, but it’s not really an ideal machine for this sort of thing. Then by chance I found myself having access to a more powerful Windows system and at the same time found some good Premiere Pro tutorials up on the Creative Cow web site so I thought I would give it a try (and taking advantage of Premiere Pro being for both Windows and Mac).

Both Premiere Pro and Final Cut are non-linear editors where you can chop and change video clips and drag them around. Both have numerous different effects built in and you can adjust white balance and sort out colour correction. Titles and captions can be added and both have audio editing facilities. The only real restriction on them is your imagination as to what you want to do!

On both, where my original video has been a couple of simple clips, perhaps me just talking about a film I’ve seen recently and have not required a significant amount of processing I’ve had the whole process of import, clip editing, sound adjustment, and then rendered out ready for YouTube upload all done well within an hour. So if things go well and you’ve got it right in camera at the video recording stage then for short videos things can be done really quickly.

One thing I like about Premiere Pro compared to Final Cut is that it is more flexible when it comes to reading video files. I copy the recordings across from my camera onto my computer hard drive and Final Cut wants to see the whole file structure of the AVCHD directory, and if anything is played with or altered or deleted anywhere within that directory tree then Final Cut can throw a bit of a hissy fit and doesn’t want to work with the files, where with Premiere Pro you can happily use your system’s file manager to tunnel down into the directory and into the individual recording clips, get rid of the ones you don’t want, copy across into this area others you might want to use and Premiere Pro is still quite happy with everything.

Final Cut also wants to transcode new clips before it will use them which can delay getting started where Premiere Pro will run clips natively, but then I’ve found for editing Final Cut does seem to run that bit more smoothly. It also just needs say two or three actions to complete a task where Premiere Pro may need three or four actions. There’s one area I’ve found Final Cut to be far better at, and that’s with green screen / chroma key editing. I can get a good key sorted out far quicker and with better results  compared to Premiere.

Both can be a bit fiddly when it comes to settings for exporting and both take their time for the final rendering processing. This is where the more powerful hardware really comes into play for cutting down that time.

I’ve found both Premiere Pro and Final Cut great products. Skills learnt through using one are quite transferable across to the other. Both have been fun to use, on the other hand both have given me headaches at times.

Overall, I think if I was just going to be doing standard video editing and only video editing, then I’d choose Final Cut. Since it came out they have updated it with most of those missing features that weren’t there at time of release. However as I’m going to be playing around with Photoshop as well and the way Adobe is enabling their different programs to smoothly interact with each other means that for the time being I’m going to stick with Premiere Pro.

What I would suggest to anyone whose currently undecided is to find a suitable tutorial web site (I found Creative Cow quite good), compare the tutorials for one against the tutorials for the other and then decide on which you would feel most comfortable using.

I’ll will also add that I did briefly play with Avid, however although it’s education price is quite competitive I did find it rather klunky to use and it didn’t settle down to it. I just found it a bit too irritating. I could see it had huge potential, however it wasn’t for me.

My YouTube video talking about this.

Samsung Galaxy Note 2

I’ve had my Samsung Galaxy Note 2 for a couple of months now, and I must admit I like it more than I expected.

As much as I also like my iPhone 3GS, towards the end of last year it started to physically fall to bits, my contract was fast approaching renewal time, and it was also approaching Apple announcement time for the new iPhone.

However as we’ll as looking forward to seeing what this new iPhone was going to be like, the Samsung Galaxy Note 2 had also got my attention. Something a bit new and different, but was very uncertain about its size. Then we had the new iPhone announcement and I was not overly impressed with it. A slightly bigger screen, a bit more powerful, more a collection of minor updates than anything new and exciting, so gave the Note 2 another look.

It was not an easy decision to actually go for it. A great deal of time was spent in phone shops handling the original Note and then the Note 2 once it arrived on the high street, but I eventually got fed up with all this messing around and went for it.

For me two things really stand out.

Firstly, the obvious one, size. Is it really too big for routine use? However within an hour of getting it out of its box I had acclimatised to it, it really was that quick. No longer did I see it as large but other devices now felt so small and dinky. Despite its size it fits into the hand quite nicely (unlike something like the iPad Mini where you’re having to stretch your hand around to hold it).

For those who like to do things one-handed, lots of tasks can still be performed that way. The virtual keyboard is within reach of your thumb, however you can bias it for left or right handed use if you prefer. Have all your commonly used icons located on the lower half of the screen and there’s very few times you have to really stretch or go two handed if you don’t want to.

However I much prefer using it two-handed (this has applied to all the phones I’ve had). I guess I’m an intrinsic two-handed user, I always found it so much more comfortable doing it that way. One hand for holding securely, the other for fast use.

The other thing that makes this phone stand out is its stylus. Hold the stylus with your hand positioned anywhere near the centre of the screen and with very little finger movement everything is within reach. The stylus is great for making note type jottings and the its handwriting recognition is far better than I expected. I’ve used various other devices with this feature over the years and up till now it always turned into a case of once the novelty wore off then that function fell into disuse, but the Note 2’s system works amazingly well. I’ve even just used a finger to write on the screen and that’s been good enough for the system to work with. The stylus is also pressure sensitive, so for those who like drawing and that sort of thing there’s potential for great fun there.

Going back to its size, it will fit into a typical back pocket, but over the years (regardless of size or type of phone) I’ve never been one for carrying phones around like that. Too easy to lose or damage. This, like all my earlier ones, happily lives in a pouch on my trouser belt. This also gets round the problem of remembering where you last put it; jacket pocket, hold-all, bag, on the table… I’ve never yet forgotten where my trousers are!

I use the phone mainly for data related stuff; it’s constantly monitoring various e-mail accounts, messaging, web browsing and general internet use. Also as an ‘office assistant’ for calendar and appointments, occasionally as a wi-fi hot spot, it’s not often used for voice or as a music device. I’m getting a comfortable two days (occasionally three) between recharges, though I do leave wi-fi and 3G switched off except when I need them.
I’ve found the current Android operating system (4.1) fast and snappy. As someone who also has an iPhone and an iPad, iOS now seems so clunky to use it’s becoming irritating, where this Android version seems to have the edge over it.

I have no special loyalty to Apple or to Android (or to any other operating system), they’re just systems and devices for getting jobs done. So when given the choice a couple of months ago of going either iPhone 5 or Samsung Galaxy Note 2 I went for the Note 2 and have no regrets.
I’ll be quite happy one day to go back to Apple, but if they want me back they’ll have to do something quite remarkable.

Belkin LiveAction Microphone

Last Christmas I was given a present of a Belkin LiveAction microphone, so I thought I’d give it the once over.

On the box it stated that it was for iPhone / iPad type devices, however it uses the standard jack plug that’s common across most devices. It worked without any problems on the two different Samsung phones I have.

It’s about 12 cm / 4.75 inches long, so not that large, but is quite big compared to the size of a phone. If plugged into the phone and you’re using the camera that facing the way the microphone is pointing, then end of the mic may come into view. (Just something to be aware of.)

Once plugged in, there is a small knob to turn that helps to secure the device to the phone. On the side there is a three position switch. Off, close-up directional, long distance ‘super-directional’. It uses a standard AAA size battery.

Over the years, phone manufacturers have spent a lot of time, money and effort in improving their internal microphones. Under standard indoor conditions I didn’t find any huge advantage to using the Belkin. Where it really did come into play was outside. Using its standard directional setting it picked up my voice quite nicely while cutting out (or at least reducing to an acceptable level) most of the other background sounds. At one time I was standing beside a busy road where the level of traffic noise was such that if I was talking to somebody standing beside me I’d have had to shout, however the Belkin picked up my speech nicely. I can see this having some potential in a gig or live event type situation where you want the sound from the stage while minimising the noise from the crowd beside you.

Using it switched to its super-directional mode it did pick up speech from quite a few metres / yards away. The quality of sound was not particularly good, however I’d rather have some sound that may be poor but I can work with that no sound at all! I can’t see myself using it in this mode very much, though I guess it’s handy to have there.

Overall I rather like it. With phone video quality improving more and more people are using this function when out and about, and under difficult conditions this Belkin does do a better job than the phone’s internal microphone. It does however still pick up wind noise, I must look out for a windshield / dead cat screen for it.

 

 

Windows 8: first thoughts.

So, what about Windows 8.

I’m currently using three different computers that are running Windows 8. Two are desk-tops, one a lap-top, all three at least six year old and now rather underpowered for modern use.
On all three, Windows 8 installed from DVD in about half an hour and went unexpectedly smoothly. Using the Microsoft drivers the lap-top’s graphics weren’t particularly good. Not too surprised, the manufacturers web site states the machine is not Win 7 or 8 compatible! However found some drivers which, when run under XP mode, worked better.

On one of the desk-tops, on first install it didn’t pick up on the sound card. A quick driver download sorted that. Did a Win 8 re-install and it must have found these drivers on the hard drive because this time sound worked a treat.

I really can’t be bothered with the new, what was called Metro desktop, so go straight to the classic option. Having machines dual booting between Win 7 and 8 means I can do some performance comparisons between them and found, to my surprise, Win 8 running between 5% and 10% faster than the same machine when running Win 7. This I had not expected. I’m not too sure what I was expecting, but not this increase in performance.
I’ve found Win 8 runs all my programs without problems. It’s not mucked me about and I’m quite happy to use is as my principle day to day operating system. It’s certainly made we curious to try a proper touch-screen device and see what I make of that,  though I have no plans to move away from my Android phones. Anyway I have an iPhone 3GS as a back-up for them, and I really don’t want to be running a third system.

Something I think I shall do is make myself a new Microsoft account and then log in with that and see how well the Microsoft synchronisation works across different machines. I’m actually quite happy with my current Google / Gmail set-up for cross-machine working, especially as it works across Windows and Apple devices, however it never does any harm keeping an eye on alternatives (opposition?).

 

 

Glasgow’s Christmas market

For many years now there’s a Christmas market in Glasgow. It has in the past been based in George Square, around the ice rink and the other Christmas decorations that appear there each year. A mix of stalls from around rural Scotland plus numerous ones in from all over continental Europe. However for the last year or so it’s been down in St Enoch’s Square. Having it there beside St Enoch’s shopping centre means that for your serious shopaholic there’s an even greater choice of places demanding the attention of your wallet or purse, all in quite a small area!

As size goes, it’s nothing like as large as I’ve seen down in Manchester or Birmingham, but it does bring in a bit of variety and non-local shopping potential to the city centre. For the cold and hungry shopper there’s always been plenty to eat (and drink) and lots of relatively unusual trinkets and gifts to buy as presents for others.

However this year Christmas market there seems to be far fewer stalls there, especially fewer in from Europe. I guess the ever increasing cost of transport added to general consumer belt tightening means that for many traders it’s no longer worth the risk of heaving their goods half way across Europe only to find recession hit shoppers keeping their wallets and purses firmly closed, so they’re then having to heave a whole mass of unsold goods back again.

A shame, lets hope for better next year.

Mac or Windows – its upgrade time.

It’s almost decision time, but will it be Mac or will it be windows?

My original move to using a Mac was relatively indirect. I, like many people, had started my video editing with Windows MovieMaker. However soon upgraded to a basic budget priced editing package which did me for nearly a year. I could see it had a potential greater than what I was using it for, but there was very little support and virtually no tutorials around for it.

So time for something new. I hunted around on the web to find sites with good general video editing tutorials. Came across the IzzyVideo site where there was some excellent Final Cut Pro 7 and Final Cut Express examples. FCP 7 was both a bit of an overkill for my uses plus too expensive, however the education price of Express was within my budget. Next, what did Express run on; OS X. This coincided with a need for replacement hardware anyway, but as I couldn’t afford a new Mac I ended up with a second-hand MacBook. So began my Apple adventure. I’ve ended up with a 3GS iPhone, iPad, MacBook Air, and with an external monitor and keyboard attached, the MacBook used as a desktop machine.

However the MacBook is now seriously showing its age. One reason for using it as a desktop machine is that its battery is screwed. It has trouble running some programs and others won’t install because of its outdated graphics, its processor is constantly being hammered to death (cooling fan often freaking out!) and it’s got it’s fill of RAM but needs more.

Add to that my 3GS, as good as it is, is also showing its age. It’s battery still gives OK life however there are cracks creeping up its back cover, the On/Off button is missing, many new iOS features and more and more Apps coming out will not run on it… You get the idea.

So it’s decision time. Stay with Apple or move on? Apple does make some excellent products, but they are very overpriced (even after education discount). Are they worth the price premium?

The thing is Apple appears to be losing its innovative edge; at one time it was the undisputed leader in design an innovation, but now seems to be playing catch-up.
Going back a few years, the first iPod revolutionised the portable music scene (and helped to pull the company back from a very poor financial situation), the first iPhone showed what a difference a good interface can make, the iPad opened up the world of the tablet. The MacBook Air showed how to make a really nice portable laptop, iMacs had their own unique design.

However so many recent product releases have just been incremental rather than trend-setting. Android now more than competes with its smoothness of system operation. Many other screens give a better viewing experience that a Retina display. In numbers, Google’s Play store competes with Apple’s App store and is catching up in quality and range of Apps, Google’s Now voice search more than competes with Siri. A year or so ago Apple would never have released something like its Maps App in such a poor state of dysfunction.

My phone contract renewal time coincided with the Apple autumn announcement season, so I had been waiting with the proverbial bated breath to see what was coming up, and as a result I’m now the proud owner of a Samsung Galaxy Note 2.

There were two ‘final things’ that made me not stay iPhone. First, I had hoped the iPhone 5 would have been something exciting and new, not just a slightly stretched screen and updated processor. Second, iCloud. Over the last year I’ve moved from just being an internet user to that of using the cloud for more and more for my data storage and services, and iCloud just does not do it for me. Google was born in the cloud and inherently seems to do this sort of thing so much better than Apple.

This leaves me thinking about what may happen early next year when I look towards a computer upgrade.

The new iMacs look very tempting, but at a price. However I find myself using Adobe’s CS6 photo products more and more, so for video moving across to CS6 or even Avid’s Media Composer (both Adobe and Avid are cross-platform and both have competitive education prices) would give me the option to stay Mac, but not the absolute need which staying with FCP X would require.

For less than an iMac I can get a similarly specified non-Apple machine, either Adobe or Avid software, and have money to spare for extras like external back-ups. So, as much as I like Macs it’s far from certain that I’ll stay Mac for my computing.

(One final thing, I’ve been surprised at how quickly Macs age. I have a 10 year old Windows laptop which is still in regular productive use. Ten years ago means G3 powered iBooks. I wonder how many of them are still as useful?)

Camera Accessories

Three of my favourite camera accessories,

the sort of things that if they went missing or broke I’d be down the shops the same day to get replacements.

For video work (even though I only do basic YouTube type stuff) I really do like using a proper Rode external microphone. The ones built into your usual video camera are at best ‘adequate’, the ones in your video capable dSLRs are usually terrible. Getting the sound nicely sorted can make such a difference; to be able to clearly hear the story being told or to enjoy the music without having to struggle is more important that having a perfectly crisp image.

If being used outside, then going with the microphone is its windshield, a usually grey coloured furry cover, often known as a ‘dead cat’. This things really can cut out the wind noise, that loud ‘woosh’ sort of sound that can so overpower the sound you want to be recording.

My Manfrotto MP3-D01 fold flat mini tripod adds an extra dimension to slow shutter speed photography. It’s small enough and light enough to be left attached to the bottom of my camera and provides basic tripod support where ever I am. It’s three rather stubby legs can be adjusted to provide a stable platform on almost any surface. Great for night shots or where you want to prop your camera up at a slightly odd angle. It means you can also take ground level pictures but without putting your camera directly onto what could be a rather wet or dirty surface. Small, light, it’s one of those ‘fit and forget’ type devices.

Not that often used, but when videoing in low light situations (I do like to get out to castles and that sort of thing) my battery powered LED lighting brick (F&V Z-Flash) is so useful. Attaches to my camera with a hot-shoe adapter, it means that whenever I go into a relatively dark room I have enough light for my camera not to have a fit ramping up ISO setting or doing weird thing with aperture or shutter speeds.

It runs for hours off its (rechargeable) battery pack so I don’t need to worry about constantly having to switch it on and off. It’s also useful for still photography as a fill-in light and helps to take the edge of the harshness you can get from flash. (Also a great source of light at home in the event of a power cut!!!)

Phone size; Apple’s problem.

Phone size, Who is Apple’s target audience?

Those very first mobile phones were large brick-sized devices. They might seem a bit silly now but the size was just a reflection of the electronics of the time. However as technology developed they soon shrank down to small brick size then down to large hand held then on to pocket size items. Test messaging did not demand a particularly large screen so minimum phone size ended up very much controlled by keypad size and battery capacity.
There was then the arrival of “the Internet” on phone type devices so screens had to jump up in size to be able to present this data in a viewable format. So phones started to get a bit bigger again with this larger (colour) screen and mini QWERTY keyboards for alpha-numeric input.

In the way that early internet use on computers was dominated by the technologically literate and only later (with the arrival of broadband?) moved across to the more general population, so early phone data use was also dominated by this techno-crowd, and by its very nature, a relatively young crowd. These first internet displaying devices seemed to settle down to a screen size of 3 to 3.5 in (70 – 90 mm), a reasonable balance between physical size, screen quality and cost.

However more recently screen sizes have increased with numerous models covering the 4 inch (100 mm) range and things like the Galaxy Notes going well into the 5 inch (130mm) domain, though Apple has remained down at the smaller end of the scale, just tweaking its new iPhone up from 3.5 to 4 inches.

Is staying this small a wise move by Apple? These new larger size phones are proving quite popular, but then so is their iPhone. However by not providing something in the larger screen range I think Apple is losing out in a fast developing market – and that’s in the slightly older crowd who’s expanding their mobile phone use to include internet data; and what’s more, Apple could start (has started) losing people because of this.

Why? Once you get into middle age your eyes quite naturally lose a degree of their elascicity and it makes it harder to focus on near objects, reading becomes difficult, glasses or contact lenses become a necessity. So a small screen so easily used before becomes a burden where a larger screen makes interaction with your phone so much easier. Also with data speeds (both land line and mobile) increasing more is being expected from whatever device you are using, so trying to squash all that into a small screen is becoming problematic.

I have an iPhone 3GS, a great device. However some time ago I decided to do some upgrading but went the Samsung Galaxy S II route. I still use the 3GS, but that larger S II screen makes reading or looking at web pages a so much nicer experience. If I was to do an upgrade now (this is not long after the iPhone 5 release) top of my shortlist is the Galaxy Note II.
(By chance, while writing this I noticed a Tweet from Austin Evans (@duncan33303), a young highly technology literate guy with some good YT videos… “Just fired up Kindle for Android on the Galaxy Note II. It’s actually big enough to read comfortably.”)
To me this Note II gives a screen large enough to display maps and ‘detailed information’ nice and clearly, just large enough to have two applications running on the screen at the same time, yet is still small enough (just!) to be highly portable.

When Apple developed their iPad Mini they obviously wanted to differentiate it from the popular 7 inch tablet crowd such as the new Kindles or Nexus 7, so they’ve made it a 7.9 inch device. I personally think it’s a great device however it still leaves a big hole in their range of something pocket-size but still ‘big’. I so wish they’d made the new iPad different by going down to say 6 inch, so providing something for those who, like me, was very happy their iPhone but now wants that larger screened item.

Apple might say that they don’t care about this other market, they’re quite happy re-inventing the iPhone every now and again and catching the next group of teenagers wanting phones, but I think this is very ‘short sighted’ approach. I want a set-up where I can seamlessly go from phone to tablet to desk-top computer. If I end up moving away from the iPhones when my 3GS eventually dies a death then I’ll want my next tablet upgrade to match my phone’s system so good-bye old iPad, and of course I’ll want my desk-top to match…

 

(Austin Evans YouTube channel.)