Tag Archives: android

iPhone Upgrade

I’ve just updated my mobile phone to a new iPhone.

As much as I love my Samsung Note 2, it is getting left behind technology-wise. Finger print readers, contactless payment systems, 4G connection speeds, camera quality and so on has made my Note 2 somewhat dated – though it’s still quite a powerful machine. The obvious natural choice would be to move up to a Note 5 (though for some reason Samsung seems very slow in releasing it in the U.K.), however for one specific reason I’ve shifted across to the iPhone.

I’ve got rather fed up with the Android operating system update routine.

Google goes through its usual announcement of the next major operating system release. Naturally the phone manufacturers then announce their support for it too. We then have, sometime later, it arriving on one or two of the Nexus devices. The other manufacturers will announce which of their new phones may get it, they may release it as an update for some very recent models (while still bringing out new models still running the old version), and though the manufacturers may have released updates there is still the local carriers, your Vodafones and all that crowd, to decide if and when they will put out the update. Rumours circulate, companies say one thing, then a couple of months later say the exact opposite, networks aren’t interested…

Then there ‘s the problem with those models (like my Note 2) which are no longer front line devices, and as such no longer make money for the suppliers and manufacturers. They may or may not at some time in the near or distant future get a full or partial upgrade depending even on what region of the world you are or are not located in.

This even means that you can have a nice new shiny model but with this system and its delays you may not get your upgrade until the next upgrade cycle is already happening!

Compare this to Apple. You get operating system upgrades announced. Sometime later they’ll announce actual dates and to which models it will apply to. Then you have it released around the world at the same time. Yes, there are problems and bugs and things don’t go as planned, but then this happens with Android, Windows and everything else. However at least with Apple you know where you stand. A certain range of models will get the update, others won’t.
That’s that. (If you really want to there is the possible option of jail-breaking older devices to force an update onto them, but that’s another can of worms altogether.)

So it is because of this that I have moved (back) to Apple for my latest phone improvement. I’ll still have my Note 2 with its stylus (which I really like) as my secondary or stand-by device with a pay-as-you-go SIM in it, but right now I’m busy getting my apps sorted out and seeing what this iPhone can actually do.

BlackBerry Z10

I’ve never taken BlackBerry that seriously.

It’s main feature has been based around (secure) messaging, and the amount of messaging I do (secure or otherwise) is quite minimal. For me my mobile phones are primarily used as portable computing type gadgets, with an emphasis placed on internet-related stuff. (If my phone rings I totally freak out – using it for calls is its least used function.)

However it’s been this ‘internet-related’ bit that that got me looking at them. I wanted a fast 4G connection device suitable for lap-top and tablet tethering, but already having a really nice smartphone I didn’t want to spend large sums of money replacing that when the only gain would be 4G, so I was looking for a budget-end device to compliment this high-end phone.

This is where the BlackBerry Z10 came in. The cheapest 4G devices I could see were a couple of Nokia phones, but they had rather poor screens and would only tether as a Wi-Fi hotspot. I wanted this feature but I also wanted to be able to tether via a USB connection and these would not do that.

The next cheapest I could see was in the Carphonewarehouse chain which was selling the BlackBerry Z10 (unlocked) at a very competitive price. I did my research, read various reviews (which generally rated the phone quite highly, but at its original price rather over-priced) and then went ahead and got one.

From the moment I switched it on I was impressed. A really nice screen (1280 x 768 at 356 ppi, compared to the latest iPhone 5s at 1136 x 640 and 326 ppi) and gives crisp text and great colours. An operating system that I found quicker to learn and more intuitive that either iOS, Android or WP8, and with its ability to run most Android apps as well as native BlackBerry ones, no lack of app functionality. The browser is probably the best phone browser I’ve come across in a mobile phone, opening up difficult web pages faster and more completely than any other. Scrolling across screens is smooth and fast, apps open up quickly, the microSD card slot lets you add additional memory; it’s just a really nice device to use!

If I was going to ask for one improvement, then that would be battery life. It does give me a full day’s use but it would have been nice to be able to squeeze two days out of it. Naturally it will do my Wi-Fi and USB tethering. (It should tether through Bluetooth too, though I’ve never bothered with that.)

This has just been such an unexpectedly pleasant experience its got me re-thinking quite what I expect from a mobile phone or tablet type device. I suspected that Microsoft’s Windows Phone 8 system will become over the next year or so far more popular, and where a few weeks ago I really could not have cared as to BlackBerry’s future, now I hope they do manage to get their problems sorted and give Microsoft a good run for their money at the alternative to the iOS / Android duopoly.

Some YouTube Z10 thoughts.

Internet Privacy

 So what about internet privacy and being anonymous.

My main browser is Google Chrome, and on machines I regularly use I have it set up so things like my bookmarks automatically come up. I also use YouTube, Google calendar and various other Google services, so I know (and accept) that Google is ‘watching me’. I’m happy enough (realistic enough) to accept that my level of internet privacy is rather limited.

I also use Firefox, occasionally Opera, and very occasionally Internet Explorer – usually just for those sites that insist on only working with IE (almost always work related ones that I can’t avoid).
When it comes to searching, then it’s usually Google. Occasionally I’ll try Bing or Yahoo, not for any special reason other than as something different for a change. They do actually throw up quite different results – try searching for your own name and see the different number of hits they show.

Early Saturday afternoon and it’s time to head into the city. A couple of places I wanted to go to so a quick internet search to remind me of their locations. However rather than search through Google I thought I’d try using ixquick (which claims to be the world’s most private search engine). I’d heard of it and was curious to see how it performed, which was exactly as expected. It threw up a page of sensible responses, and even from the couple of lines displayed against each of the results I could see enough of an address to remind me where these places were.

What surprised me was that ten minutes later when I picked up my (Android) phone was to see a message from Google giving me directions to one of the places I’d searched for through this ‘private’ search engine.

What I suspect had happened was that browsers often automatically start to download any links that are on the page being looking at, so if you then click on the link that new page will appear so much more quickly. On my search page one of those links will have been a Google Maps page, Google will have recognised the machine this request came from and promptly, being extra-clever (!!!), sent to my Android / Google powered phone instructions on how to get there.

There’s more to keeping yourself private on the internet than people realise!

https://www.ixquick.com/

Windows 8 future potential

 Windows 8, how’s it going to go.

Very shortly Windows 8 / Windows Phone 8 will be out; what’s going to happen?
I assume on the computer side of things, as new machines arrive with Windows 8 pre-installed the operating system will naturally spread through the user world. Microsoft has already ended its mainstream support for both XP and Vista, and XP’s extended support will end in the not too distant future, so corporations still hanging on to XP are going to have to upgrade soon.
Microsoft has already announced that its service pack support for 7 will end next year, so again, more reasons for looking towards 8.

What about the phones and tablets, will it break into the Android / Apple duopoly.
One thing that could give it an advantage is that it’s relatively free from the legal arguments going on between the Android and Apple communities. This could make it very tempting for the business world that does *not* like getting involved in other people’s legal wrangles. At the moment they don’t have much choice, Blackberry seems in terminal decline which really just leaves them looking towards the two arguing ‘big boys’.

So if Microsoft can come along and provide a user system with some quality phones and tablets (devices announced by Nokia, HTC and Samsung seem to be getting some good press) that will seamlessly integrate in with their desktop machines and without these Apple / Android uncertainties, then I could see business being quite tempted. Combine this business use with those individuals who want to give it a try and this should provide a more than big enough user base to get developers interested.

So I would not be too surprised if in a couple of years time it had sorted itself out to be something like 40% Android, 40% Apple and 20% Windows 8, and (unless they can do something quite amazing really quickly) RIM / Blackberry seriously struggling.

One thing to remember; before the iPhone came along, in places like the USA those earlier Windows Mobile based phones had about 40% of the market, so if they’ve done it before then there’s a fair chance they can do it again.